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Total parenteral nutrition, or TPN, is a type of intravenous feeding given to people who cannot get enough nutrients by eating. It may also be used for people with certain medical conditions that prevent the body from absorbing food. The nurse caring for the client receiving total parenteral nutrition needs to know about care techniques and what can go wrong in order to provide quality care.

This blog post will discuss how a nurse cares for a client receiving total parenteral nutrition and what they need to know in order to give good care. The nurse caring for the client receiving total parenteral nutrition needs to know about care techniques and what can go wrong in order to provide quality care.

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TPN is given through an intravenous tube that goes into a large vein near one of the client’s hearts or both arms at the same time. It may be given as soon as possible after someone has had surgery, because it helps prevent infection. When starting TPN, nurses should use strict sterile technique so they don’t introduce bacteria from their hands into the bloodstream. They also need to keep careful records with everything documented: how much fluid and food are being consumed; any problems such as vomiting or diarrhea; fluids running out of tubes due to disconnection or leakage; blood pressure changes.

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