windmills, clouds, fog @ Pixabay

A quantum particle is described by a wave function ψ(x)=ae−αx2, where a and α are real, positive constants. The momentum of the particle can be found from p=√(h/a)ψ′(x), which leads to the relationship between energy E=p2/2m and kinetic energy T=E-PE=-1/2mω2a.

windmills, clouds, fog @ Pixabay

The momentum of the particle can be found from p=√(h/a)ψ′(x), which leads to the relationship between energy E=p²/m and kinetic energy T=E-PE=-¼mωα. The probability distribution function for a quantum particle is given by ρ(x)=ae−α|x|, where |x| denotes length in units of x. The probability distribution function for a quantum particle is given by ρ(x)=ae−α|x|, where |x| denotes length in units of x. The energy E=p²/m and kinetic energy T=E-PE=-¼mωα can be found from the momentum p=√(h/a)ψ′(x), which leads to the relationship between these two quantities. The energy E=p²/m and kinetic energy T=E-PE=-¼mωα can be found from the momentum p=(h/(a))ψ'(), which leads to this relationship between these two quantities. This article would like to discuss how wave functions are used as

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